Digital library

  • Four species of Porphyra, P.Vietnamensis, P.suborbiculata, P. Indica and P. Kanyakumariensis have been reported definitely from the Indian Coast. In addition, the protein, lipid and carbohydrate content of the species and hydrological parameters of the ambient waters are also given.

    Author(s): Chennubhotla, V S Krishnamurthy, Mathew, Susan, Imelda, Joseph
  • Four species of Porphyra, P. vietnamensis. P. suborbiculata, P. indica and £: kanyakumariensis have been reported definitely from the Indian coast. Porphyra kanyakumariensis is now reported at a number of stations along the Kerala coast. In addition, the protein, lipid and carbohydrate content of the species and hydrological parameters of the ambient waters are also given.

    Author(s): Chennubhotla, V S Krishnamurthy, Mathew, Susan, Imelda, Joseph
  • Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have revolutionized many areas of biological research due to the sharp reduction in costs that has led to the generation of massive amounts of sequence information. Analysis of large genome data sets is however still a challenging task because it often requires significant computer resources and knowledge of bioinformatics. Here, we provide a guide for an uninitiated who wish to analyze high-throughput NGS data. We focus specifically on the analysis of organelle genome and metagenome data and describe the current bioinformatic pipelines suited for this purpose.

    Author(s):
  • The vast majority of global aquaculture production (c. 88%1) is either marine plants, filter feeding shellfish, or omnivorous/freshwater finfish with a low requirement for marine protein and lipid derived feeds. However, the remaining small (but important to Scotland and other EU27 states) percentage are carnivorous finfish species, which require commercially formulated feeds that contain high levels of protein and lipid. The traditional source of the raw materials to manufacture these diets has been fishmeal and fish oils derived from the feed fish capture sector – largely to ensure that the amino acid and fatty acid components are nutritionally suitable for the finfish species being cultivated.
     
    This issue was discussed at a recent Marine Conservation Society workshop - “Feeding the Fish of the Future – Alternative choices for aquafeeds”2, which highlighted the increasing need for the aquaculture feeds of the future to rely on alternative, non-marine or nontraditional marine ingredients. The event also highlighted the growing interest and concern for the future formulation of aquaculture feeds by policy makers, environmental NGO’s, feed companies, and retailers, including the extent to which algae, as a “marine” source, could potentially be a viable ingredient for aquafeeds.
     
    Author(s): Scottish Aquaculture Research Forum (SARF)
  • A PDF on "A seaweed cultivation business - Dream or reality?".

    Author(s): Pål Bakken, Andreas Pütz, Frank Neumann, Luiza Saliba Neves, Hélia Medinas, Artur Simões, Jon Funderud, Svein Jarle Horn, Kaia Kjølbo Rød
  • Humanity faces difficult tradeoffs in producing sufficient food to feed our growing population and stabilizing our climate system. Globally our food system is not sustainable, does not provide adequate nutrition to everyone on the planet and, at the same time, changes to our climate threaten the future of farming as we know it. Agriculture is both part of the problem and part of the solution to climate change. We must seize every opportunity to shift away from inefficient farm practices, supply chains and diet choices towards long-term sustainability, profitability and health.

    To bring our interconnected food and climate systems within a ‘safe operating space’ for people and the planet, the Commission on Sustainable Agriculture and Climate Change has outlined seven major areas for policy action. Over the past year, I have worked with my colleagues on the Commission to harvest the practical solutions detailed in the many recent authoritative reports on food security and climate change. By combining this thorough review of the substantive evidence base with the diverse perspectives and disciplinary expertise of the 13 Commissioners, we have crafted a succinct roadmap for policy makers. We offer no ‘one-size-fits-all’ solutions, but rather point the way forward to foster national, regional and sectoral innovation that can aggregate up to meaningful global change.

    Author(s):
  • To bring our interconnected food and climate systems within a ‘safe operating space’ for people and the planet, the Commission on Sustainable Agriculture and Climate Change has outlined seven major areas for policy action. Over the past year, I have worked with my colleagues on the Commission to harvest the practical solutions detailed in the many recent authoritative reports on food security and climate change. By combining this thorough review of the substantive evidence base with the diverse perspectives and disciplinary expertise of the 13 Commissioners, we have crafted a succinct roadmap for policy makers. We offer no ‘one-size-fits-all’ solutions, but rather point the way forward to foster national, regional and sectoral innovation that can aggregate up to meaningful global change.

    Author(s): Sir John Beddington, Mohammed Asaduzzaman, Megan Clark, Adrian Fernández, Marion Guillou, Molly Jahn, Lin Erda, Tekalign Mamo, Nguyen Van Bo, Carlos A Nobre, Robert Scholes, Rita Sharma, Judi Wakhungu
  • To determine the effect of the defatted H. pluvialis meal in diet on shrimp growth proformance and pigmentation.

    Author(s): Zhi Yong Ju, PH. D.
  • As early as 1927, Prof. M. O. P. Iyengar gave a brief account of the flora of Krusadai Island and other collecting grounds in the Gulf of Mannar and Palk Bay areas near Mandapam. Later on, Boergesen (1937a, b ; 1938) reported a large number of the algae occurring around Mandapam in his contributions on south Indian algal flora, but the green algae of this area were not included in this work. Since then, detailed attempts have not been made to study the algal flora of Mandapam, but for a provisional list of algae of Krusadai Island (Chacko et ah, 1955) and a paper on a new species of Halicystis (Iyengar & Ramanathan, 1954). While working on some ecological aspects of marine algae of Mandapam, the author had the opportunity to collect algae in the different seasons of the year, in the vicinity of Mandapam (79°8' E, 9''17' N) and nearby places like Pudumadam and Kilakarai. Among the collections made since 1964 some plants have not been previously recorded from Mandapam area ; a list of these algae is given in this report with brief notes on their distribution.

    Author(s): Rao, M Umamaheswara
  • IMTA plus renewable energy production is food-aquaculture that scales up to meet 100% of world energy demand based on enhancing a natural ecosystem. In the long term, IMTA+E can economically and environmentally replace world fossil fuel use, while expanding food supplies with fish and plants and reversing global warming.

     

    Author(s): Mark Capron

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